RECOGNIZING the SIGNS of BURNOUT


Monday morning blues. But, have you ever experienced a case of the “Sundays”?

Everyone has a bad day here or there, maybe even a bad week. When there are more bad days at work than good, it is time to take a hard look at the situation.

Burnout is a cumulative effect and can creep up on you if you are not cognizant of the warning signs. It usually occurs when underestimating stress or working too long without adequate time off. When one works overtime, they tend to neglect their outlets for relieving stress, including spending time with family and friends, hobbies, reading for pleasure, or exercise.

When a person experiences burnout, all of their relationships suffer. As relationships breakdown, the person experiencing burnout begins to feel even more stress.

The best way to prevent burnout is to recognize the most common signs. Knowing the common and personal signs of burnout is important:

• A feeling of dread during the workweek and on Sunday night
• Performing work on autopilot
• Physical and mental exhaustion
• Frequent colds or illnesses
• Feeling annoyed by everything and everyone

Burnout can be attributed to half of all employee turnover, making it very costly for organizations within all industries. The top contributors to burnout include unfair compensation, increasing workloads, and too much overtime. Other contributors include poor management, lack of connection to the role, and company culture.

Recognizing the signs of burnout in yourself and in your teams can help increase satisfaction and retention. Fostering a culture that supports staff and allows for open communication can help relieve stress and the potential for burnout.

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IDENTIFYING RECRUITING PROBLEMS (Part 3 of 3)

It is helpful to gather input from “the trenches”. Asking employees to share their insight can shed light onto how team members view their jobs, managers, and the company. This can be done one-on-one, in groups, or by sending out a company wide questionnaire. The key is to include everyone, not just the individuals who may provide the answers that you want to hear. Again, do not penalize them for being open and honest with you if you want the best, most candid information from them.

If no clear solution can be determined after reviewing all the information, it might be time to call in reinforcements. The unbiased opinion and advice of a management consultant or recruiter may be the best option. They can look over policies, procedures, and data without emotional or psychological attachment and help craft an unbiased plan for improvement.

Remember attracting and retaining the best talent is a challenge for all industries. Today’s market even more so.

IDENTIFYING RECRUITING PROBLEMS (Part 2 of 3)

During this process, be certain to review exit interviews. What is revealed as an employee leaves can uncover deep, underlying issues in all areas of an organization. Make the conversation informal. Tell them you really need their help as you truly wish to improve as an organization. The key here is to LISTEN and to not get defensive. You may not agree with everything they say, but you are getting their direct and blunt feedback, which can only benefit your way ahead.

After reviewing the questions and answers, it is time to call in reinforcements. Consult with peers and colleagues: those within the organization that will be most helpful from an “insider’s” perspective. Trusted individuals outside of the company can act as a sounding board or a voice of reason. Many times, the problems experienced at one company are actually universal to the industry.

Next: Voices From The Trenches

IDENTIFYING RECRUITING PROBLEMS (Part 1 of 3)

Recruiting top talent that is a perfect fit for an organization is not an exact science. If it were, everyone would be working the perfect position at their dream companies. Errors or difficulties in the process would not exist. However, we live in this place called reality. In reality, companies encounter issues finding and retaining great employees. Over the next three articles, we will look at how to identify and correct some common recruiting problems.

When faced with a problem, whether personal or professional, there is usually a set of steps that one takes to determine its cause and to formulate a solution. When the problem is systemic to an organization, this process is also beneficial.

When an organization has trouble with its recruiting process, it is best to first go to the source of the problem. If there are issues with attraction, or retention, or with making hiring decisions, it is best to go directly to the person or group responsible for talent acquisition and talent management. Is the process up to date designed to address key steps? Are there missing steps or steps that are overlooked – maybe even skipped? Are great candidates lost to a long decision process? How does your company cultivate relationships with passive candidates? Are team members from specific areas of the organization leaving more than others? These types of questions will demand very specific answers that apply directly to the company’s unique situation.

Next: Exit Interviews

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 3 of 3)

When recruiting, become dedicated to building a team of people who are compatible and enjoy working together. When interviewing for cultural fit, make sure the candidate fits not only the position, but the organizational dynamic. When people who genuinely like and respect each other work together, there is a dramatic increase in recruiting and retention. Your teams are more likely to share how much they enjoy working at your organization and will more likely refer top talent.

Once your organization’s values are defined and the corporate culture is created, it is time to spread the word. Ask all employees to engage with the organization on social media and encourage them to post frequently. Demonstrate your culture with videos of life in the office, team members serving their communities, or share how employees enjoy their time away from work. In the end, happy employees will gladly share in the vision and values, which will yield more recruiting success.

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 2 of 3)

To build an intentional corporate culture, it is first important to define your organization’s values. A strong values proposition statement, unique to your company, will help define the culture. It is important to ignore another organization’s values, defining your own so that they ring genuine. Create values that reflect your company and the employee lifestyle and are in keeping with the goals of your organization. When doing this, gather input from all areas of the company.

Be open to possibilities from all team members. Encourage innovative thinking. Empower them to explore solutions to issues and to create new ideas, initiatives, and products. When an organization values the input from all team members as part of their culture, an environment of forward thinking and collaboration is fostered. Employees will trust in the brand that values their input.

Next: Recruiting for Cultural Fit

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 1 of 3)

Ever feel like your employees feel differently about your organization than you do? Do your employees understand the company’s culture and value system? Your organization is a living, breathing entity, and its pulse is defined by a well-established culture and the value system that keeps its rhythm.

Corporate culture is not a mission statement, it is a way of life both in and out of the office. A successful corporate culture is shaped and managed by core company values. These values are what create the basis for hiring and branding. After salary, culture is the most important aspect of an organization to employees and candidates alike.

Intentional corporate culture will increase employee engagement, productivity, customer service, and revenue. For a culture to be successfully adopted by an entire organization, Executive Management must believe in the culture. Since buy-in trickles downstream, no one will fully believe in the company’s value statement, brand, and culture without knowing that it is supported and adhered to by those at the very top. It is vital that leaders set the standard in this way and believe in the culture they wish to establish and maintain.

Next: Building an Intentional Culture

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 3 of 3

Include videos on the Careers page that highlight different aspects of the company and corporate culture. “Day in the Life at XYZ Company” is a great way to attract candidates. Employee profiles and photos of how employees and the company give back to the community are also great talent-magnets.

Retaining Millennials is not as difficult as anticipated. There are five BIG factors to retention.
• Transparency of corporate culture.
• Communication – frequent and through many different means including email, text, and face-to-face.
• Constant feedback – frequent feedback on a monthly, weekly, or even daily basis.
• Clearly defined expectations – written outlines and milestones for projects. Define position requirements and expectations.
• Sense of purpose – have a means, either within the company or on personal time, to give back to the community.

Attracting and retaining Millennials is easy if you know where to go and what they are looking for in a company. It is without a doubt that this group of talent will help reshape work as we know it.

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 2 of 3

Technology is the obvious choice since they are so dependent upon it. Submitting a resume or application online is second nature to a group who took exams and applied for college online. Eighty-seven percent of new college grads will go directly to a company’s website to search and apply for open positions. However, they will not take time to look for postings on the website. Adding a “Careers” link on the home page of the company’s website is the best way to direct not only Millennials, but all candidates to current opportunities.

Brand recognition and corporate culture are the biggest factors to Millennials. They seek positions that are challenging and lead to opportunities for advancement. When crafting job posts or company profiles, highlight projects they may work on, mentorship opportunities, and potential advancement tracks.

Next: Include Videos

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 1 of 3

Generation Y, or the Millennials, come from highly structured childhoods where someone was always orchestrating their next steps. It is no surprise that they will utilize all available resources when embarking on their job searches. Read on to learn how to become a talent-magnet to the youngest group of candidates.

As Baby Boomers leave for retirement and Gen X moves into middle management, the Millennial generation (born early 1980’s through early 2000’s) is filling entry-level positions en masse! By 2020, Millennials, a generation larger in size than the Baby Boomer Generation, will make up half of the workforce. These fresh-faced individuals have a completely different concept of work than their elders. It makes sense that they approach job searches in their own, unique fashion.

The best way to attract the best young talent is to go to the source. College Career Services departments are seeing an increase in utilization. Sixty-five percent of Millennials participate in career services at their university. Seventy percent use networking events during their job search. Partnering with colleges, universities, and technical schools gives a company the opportunity to meet face-to-face with the next generation of talent.

Next: Employing Technology