David Manchee

Are You Catering Your Hiring Process to the Talent Pool?

I read a terrific piece by Mike Daly – The Knights Ghost (see below) on LinkedIn today that calls for two additional observations.
First, empty desks represent a loss of revenue not savings due to an unattached salary. Second, in addition to revenue loss the company also suffers a reputation blow not just from the candidate but, as an influencer, among her/his circle of friends and associates. Some lost revenue is recoverable. Reputation dings add up quickly potentially destroying years of reputation building.
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Offer declined – Candidate accepted another offer.
Manager – Why? How did that happen?
Me- We took too long.
Manager – It’s been only 3 weeks since I talked to her.
Me- 2 weeks too long, she was on the market for 3 weeks when you talked to her.
Manager – Did you know about the offer?
Me- Yes and no. She did not tell me she has an offer pending but it’s a fact, any talented person will have multiple offers within a period of time, I would say 2 to 4 weeks they are off the market.
Manager – So how do we overcome this challenge?
Me- The issue starts with the hiring process. If it’s a lengthy and boring process that does not cater to the talent pool. We will lose every time.
Manager- How do we refine the process to retain top talent?
Me- Treat talent the way they want to be treated. Do not set high walls for them to climb, shorten the hiring process with prompt feedback and collaboration between departments, create job descriptions that make sense, promote your environment and the product or project they will be a part of.
Finally, ask for feedback on the hiring process from new hires and tend to their feedback.
The hiring process has to be exciting and innovative to attract and cater to top talent. “Birds of the same feather flock together”
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What are you doing to avoid losing a star to the competition?

DIGITAL TRADITIONAL FORK IN THE ROAD

Seems like every other day I receive a referral for a solid seller who successfully transitioned from traditional media to digital. They self-educated themselves, earned digital certifications and, when asked, conveyed relevant insights from decades of sales and people experience with colleagues. They practiced consultative selling before the phrase was coined, bring well-tune listening skills to the table and succinctly communicate internally building solutions that answer client needs.
They consistently win contests, receive awards and earn the respect of former managers. Exceeding goals, conducting themselves professionally and earning respect by giving respect is their mantra.
When we speak they are anxious to contribute, to be part of successful team, to again pay income taxes and to contribute to a culture that values fun alongside of working hard (and smart) while recognizing the organization’s success is a function of maintaining work – life equilibrium. They’ll assume a leadership role and it isn’t necessary to include a management title.
Of late I’ve been wondering if these fine folks shouldn’t return to their traditional roots armed with the skills to sell cross-platform and the knowledge of where traditional media fits within the broader media landscape. Or, should they continue pushing forward for a place in the digital ecosystem?
Help me out. And help those at the digital/traditional fork-in-the-road.
What are your thoughts?

Better than When We Found It

advertorial

As a boy scout I was taught to always leave a camp site “better than we found it” which, in simple terms, meant scouring the ground for anything that wasn’t part of nature. When camping and in many instances, in life, returning to the natural state is highly desirable. I believe the concept is applicable to each generation and its responsibility to following generations. So, over the next few months I’ll do my best to tackle a pertinent subject from the current national conversation stating with fake news.
The too frequent fake news stories are more than troubling. We can agree it’s a problem, right? And, it’s a big problem when a misguided, gun-toting “fixer” arrives at a pizza joint to free young hostages and an even bigger problem when fake news is influencing free speech and the election process.
Since my career history and my current profession broadly encompasses marketing communications I’m going to address the meteoric rise in paid content (native) and, depending on how it’s presented, where it fits in the fake news universe.
Paid content, or if you prefer, native advertising is not new. Google “Advertorial”. Back in the day advertorials were clearly identified as advertisements. Today’s paid content? Not so much and therein lies the problem. Consider, The New York Times’ content group T Brand Studio, which employs 110 people and Magazine publisher Time Inc. now employs 125 people at its content group, the Foundry.
No advertiser and no reputable media wants to be found guilty of fake news. In the past editor’s managed a thin demarcation line separating edit from advertising. Today the line seems to encourage paid content osmosis.
I’m suggesting the media clean-up its “camp site” rebuilding the wall between editorial (news) and advertising clearly identifying what’s not news. As real news regains clearer visibility the media will recapture its authority and trust while fake news (propaganda) fades back into the shadows where it belongs.
In the end the media, the reader/viewer and our democracy will greatly benefit.

Ad Agency Quandary

loyalty

I recently spoke with a senior media person who has over a decade of solid career growth with a major agency. While discussing her career she confided that she loved and respected her boss but, has no loyalty to the agency. I was shocked as it’s an agency everyone, once upon a time, wanted to work for and many did after toiling as un-paid interns.
What happened? She reflected on the job parts that were once fun – mentoring, teaching and helping others advance their careers. But, that’s before the agency “over-tightened” their financial belts due, perhaps, to razor-thin compensation agreements, overly aggressive demands from corporate HQ to “send more dollars home” or, simply management more concerned about making their yearly bonus at the expense of filling a couple of seats to relieve the pressure of those clocking in more than 8 hours a day.
It seems management forgot work-life balance is real. Family first is a fact. And, when loyalty leaves the building clients are sure to follow regardless of “great fee” arrangements.
Has the time arrived for management to go on an internal listening tour?

What Makes Us Different?

star

Good Executive Search firms follow process. Great Executive Search firms tweak processes. PointClear Search finds way to reinvent processes, not just because we are expected to…but because we can’t help ourselves.

Brands Need Good Leadership

Leadership 1.0

Brands. There’s a lot of talk about brands, branding and the importance brands evolving.
Take Taylor Swift. Hugely successful ingénue country singer who successfully pivoted her brand to main stream vocal Phenom. Like Ms. Swift generations have names and identities and are brands that evolve.
For example, Baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values. As a group, baby boomers were the wealthiest, most active, and most physically fit generation up to the era in which they arrived, and were among the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time.
Let’s look at today’s punching bag generation – Millennials. I know some, some are my children and in the course of my work – recruiting, I’ve interviewed my share. Most don’t deserve to be defined with the negatively charged commentary commonly described by the press.
In my opinion the Millennial generation is at a brand cross-road. One direction leaves them on the current controversial path. The other path amplifies all that’s good about a generation that trusts, believes in giving back and cares deeply for family. What’s missing, I submit, is leadership of substance to stabilize the generation’s brand and take it to its rightful place.
So, Millennials what are you waiting for?

Don’t Fear Good Executive Recruiters

Fear

Fear is defined as an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat. Good recruiters aren’t dangerous, likely to cause pain nor do they pose a threat. So, why are so many hiring managers reluctant to engage the services of recruiters?

Is it the “fear” of admitting they can’t do everything by themselves?

I’m convinced it has more to do with time and money. They don’t take the time to consider how much recruiters add to the bottom line focusing only on the recruiter’s fee – something they and their management view as a cost or expense. But, if one does the math it’s money well spent.

Take, for example, the revenue lost while the job remains unfilled. Add the cost of the hiring manager’s time devoted to filling the position – time taken away from attending to her/his primary responsibilities. The sum is considerably more than a simple fee and grows dramatically with each day the job remains open. One might factor in the cost of morale as others are tasked with picking up the organizational slack and its impact on current customers.

So, come on hiring managers, quit dragging your feet because some bean counter says recruiters are an expense and call us! No fear. We promise.

Managing a Most Precious Commodity – TIME

Clock 1

Last week Roger’s blog examined how some companies’ inattention to moving the hiring process along with serious deliberation opens the door for quicker moving, decisive hiring managers to snap up superior talent. And, in today’s tight market every open head means lost revenue.

This week let’s examine the process as a doctor would a patient to determine what’s contributing to the long hiring cycle. Let’s consider the real cause too many layers of interviews and the extended cycle the symptom.

Consider one major time suck – the interview panel – that sometimes awkward series of back-to-back interviews populated by junior and highly experienced individuals. We know assembling the panel requires days if not weeks to organize. And then there’s the question of the members influence on the final outcome. Should panel members be afforded equal “votes”? Has the company adequately trained each of the interviewers? Are they checking off the boxes in the correct order – intelligence, cultural fit and skills?

There’s a special excitement for candidates after meeting with well-trained panels. Unfortunately momentum somehow falls into a black hole when management fails to act on panel feedback further causing the process to drag on.

If over-interviewing is crippling your quest to hire great talent are you prepared to avoid the time trap in 2016?

Get Professional. Start Your Career.

Character vs Tech Knowledge

Lately I’ve received a number of referrals looking to break into anything digital. After reviewing a bunch of resumes and checking out social media profiles here’s my response to a young, honors graduate from a top tier Boston area private university, currently working in finance and planning to relocate to NYC.

Dear Candidate,

Here’s some advice (listed below in no particular order of importance).
LinkedIn
• Grow your contacts
• Replace your photo with a professional head-shot
• Add your resume’s narrative to each job emphasizing results, milestones, innovations, etc.
• Ask employers and associates for recommendations – important!
• Include any fraternal, athletic or college associations noting leadership positions
• Add professional groups that reflect your career objectives
• Add individuals to follow – again reflecting career interests or leadership qualities that you expect to emulate
Your Resume
• Add any volunteer experience – current or past (should also be included on LinkedIn)
• Education – your resume and LinkedIn don’t match. Edit to match
Your Career – I’m going to assume you’re interested in all things digital, right? OK, so I suggest considering the following:
• Start with leader companies – places that offer internal training, mentoring and rapid career advancement – the start-ups will always be around and for every story about hitting it big with a start-up there’s scores of untold failures.
• Think about where you’d like to be 2-3 jobs from now. Find some folks who have those jobs – reach out, tell them you’re green and would like to buy them coffee just to learn what they know and how they got to where they are now. Sometimes magic happens.
• Consider Internships if you’re not fixed on a specific job type. Try to get those that pay (important for NYC living) and offer a duration of 6 months (takes 90 days to find the water closet).
• Join NYC groups and associations that reflect your career interests. Network. People will recommend those they like for jobs in their company (sometimes they earn a bonus for recommending new hires)
• Get involved – volunteer – another great networking environment plus it makes you feel good and keeps Karma happy
• If digital is your passion check with the Interactive Advertising Bureau for information on earning certifications that align with your interests and the marketplace. Sign-up, study, and get certified.
Social Media – make certain all social media reflects the professional you – you can certainly be fun loving, active, etc. but ditch the stuff you might not want to explain to your Grandmother or clergy.

I’m confident anyone reading this might have a suggestion or two so keep the advice flowing. Might just add a few Karma credits!

Do Resumes Matter Any More?

Steve Jobs

 

Each week we receive and review scores of resumes. Remember the 1966 Italian epic Spaghetti Western film starring Clint Eastwood? “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”. That title describes today’s resumes.

To limit the bad and the ugly remember a resume reflects education, experience and occasionally skills. Be certain to align this chapter of your story with social media including LinkedIn. Hiring managers scour LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts, which reflects what you believe is worth sharing about yourself. Are they reflecting the real you? Is the message positive and consistent?

What matters to hiring managers is personality, intelligence and drive. Are you driven to use your brains to acquire the knowledge that will assure your success and help grow the organization? Are you someone who earns respect among peers, clients and management? Culturally will you fit in?

What, in addition to a well-crafted resume, does one need to get in front of the hiring manager (and, past the gatekeepers)?

Consider telling your story with a short, well-written semi-biographical narrative. How did you overcome a huge hurdle? How do you lead? How do you deal with opposing views? What passion is behind seeking the next career move?

A great narrative separates you from the crowd, wins the interview and leads to the all-important chemistry question. Is this the job I can’t wait to start every morning? And, from the hiring manager’s view, is this someone I want to spend 8 plus hours with five days a week?

So, write a great resume, make certain social media reflects the real you and then tell a story that piques the interest of your potential next boss.