core values

IDENTIFYING RECRUITING PROBLEMS (Part 2 of 3)

During this process, be certain to review exit interviews. What is revealed as an employee leaves can uncover deep, underlying issues in all areas of an organization. Make the conversation informal. Tell them you really need their help as you truly wish to improve as an organization. The key here is to LISTEN and to not get defensive. You may not agree with everything they say, but you are getting their direct and blunt feedback, which can only benefit your way ahead.

After reviewing the questions and answers, it is time to call in reinforcements. Consult with peers and colleagues: those within the organization that will be most helpful from an “insider’s” perspective. Trusted individuals outside of the company can act as a sounding board or a voice of reason. Many times, the problems experienced at one company are actually universal to the industry.

Next: Voices From The Trenches

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 2 of 3)

To build an intentional corporate culture, it is first important to define your organization’s values. A strong values proposition statement, unique to your company, will help define the culture. It is important to ignore another organization’s values, defining your own so that they ring genuine. Create values that reflect your company and the employee lifestyle and are in keeping with the goals of your organization. When doing this, gather input from all areas of the company.

Be open to possibilities from all team members. Encourage innovative thinking. Empower them to explore solutions to issues and to create new ideas, initiatives, and products. When an organization values the input from all team members as part of their culture, an environment of forward thinking and collaboration is fostered. Employees will trust in the brand that values their input.

Next: Recruiting for Cultural Fit

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 1 of 3)

Ever feel like your employees feel differently about your organization than you do? Do your employees understand the company’s culture and value system? Your organization is a living, breathing entity, and its pulse is defined by a well-established culture and the value system that keeps its rhythm.

Corporate culture is not a mission statement, it is a way of life both in and out of the office. A successful corporate culture is shaped and managed by core company values. These values are what create the basis for hiring and branding. After salary, culture is the most important aspect of an organization to employees and candidates alike.

Intentional corporate culture will increase employee engagement, productivity, customer service, and revenue. For a culture to be successfully adopted by an entire organization, Executive Management must believe in the culture. Since buy-in trickles downstream, no one will fully believe in the company’s value statement, brand, and culture without knowing that it is supported and adhered to by those at the very top. It is vital that leaders set the standard in this way and believe in the culture they wish to establish and maintain.

Next: Building an Intentional Culture

INCLUDING MILLENNIALS

 

Part 3 of 3 – Millennials

You may recall Millennials want diversity in the workplace, flexibility, safety and career security, jobs that nurture their core values and the opportunity to constantly gain new experience.

While this may seem like a tall order, if a company can help cultivate this generation into leaders through mentoring, professional development, and re-recruitment, they will be rewarded with a loyal team member.

Failure to reassess the corporate organization and culture to include Millennials will result in high turnover and a loss of productivity. It will also alienate the next generation of minds who can help change the face of work as we know it.

Next time we share the best way to communicate with the more junior members of the team.