media industry

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 2 of 3

Technology is the obvious choice since they are so dependent upon it. Submitting a resume or application online is second nature to a group who took exams and applied for college online. Eighty-seven percent of new college grads will go directly to a company’s website to search and apply for open positions. However, they will not take time to look for postings on the website. Adding a “Careers” link on the home page of the company’s website is the best way to direct not only Millennials, but all candidates to current opportunities.

Brand recognition and corporate culture are the biggest factors to Millennials. They seek positions that are challenging and lead to opportunities for advancement. When crafting job posts or company profiles, highlight projects they may work on, mentorship opportunities, and potential advancement tracks.

Next: Include Videos

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Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 1 of 3

Generation Y, or the Millennials, come from highly structured childhoods where someone was always orchestrating their next steps. It is no surprise that they will utilize all available resources when embarking on their job searches. Read on to learn how to become a talent-magnet to the youngest group of candidates.

As Baby Boomers leave for retirement and Gen X moves into middle management, the Millennial generation (born early 1980’s through early 2000’s) is filling entry-level positions en masse! By 2020, Millennials, a generation larger in size than the Baby Boomer Generation, will make up half of the workforce. These fresh-faced individuals have a completely different concept of work than their elders. It makes sense that they approach job searches in their own, unique fashion.

The best way to attract the best young talent is to go to the source. College Career Services departments are seeing an increase in utilization. Sixty-five percent of Millennials participate in career services at their university. Seventy percent use networking events during their job search. Partnering with colleges, universities, and technical schools gives a company the opportunity to meet face-to-face with the next generation of talent.

Next: Employing Technology

Communicating with Millennials Continued

Part 3 of 3

In the spirit of communicating via summary sheets and videos, keep in mind that Millennials are a generation who are happy to converse via text, so when writing emails, keep them brief. Utilize the subject line to give a snapshot of the email. Better yet, utilize text. Texting is not only an acceptable form of communication but may garner a quicker response than email.

While Millennials may seem to speak a different language of IDK (I don’t know) and TL;DR (Too long; didn’t read), learning their language and communication preferences can benefit the organization as a whole.

Communicating with Millennials Continued

Part 2 of 3

 

When explaining important information, such as benefits, specific policies and procedures, and the like, face-to-face communication is best. Eighty-six percent of Millennials say that benefits influence their decision to stay with an employer. However, they do not want to spend time reading to learn about their benefits. Instead of over-stuffed information packets, face-to-face benefits presentations along with short, graphic summary sheets work best. If a face-to-face presentation is not possible, utilizing a video presentation is just as effective.

Summary sheets and videos are effective not only for benefits information, but for all aspects of the on-boarding process and company wide updates and announcements. Building a robust company intranet complete with benefits information, summary sheets, contact lists, videos, and more will keep engaged and everyone else informed.

Next: Text Speak

Communicating with Millennials

Part 1 of 3

While technology has been embraced in most of areas of the corporate world, there are still areas that remain in the “dark ages” of large handbooks, guides, and pamphlets. This is especially true when it comes to employee benefits information or other on-boarding and training materials. And, communication methods remain low-tech at some companies. With more and more Millennials entering the workforce, these methods can lead to a complete communication breakdown.

Millennials are technology dependent. They have no concept of a world without the internet and are more comfortable reading from a computer screen and typing on a keyboard, rather than writing in a notebook. Today, more college students use electronic textbooks than traditional textbooks. When sharing new employee materials or updated information, it is best to do so electronically. Placing employee handbooks, benefits package information, summary sheets, and other important information on a company intranet is ideal for everyone, not just the youngest team members.

Next: Benefits Count

INCLUDING MILLENNIALS

 

Part 3 of 3 – Millennials

You may recall Millennials want diversity in the workplace, flexibility, safety and career security, jobs that nurture their core values and the opportunity to constantly gain new experience.

While this may seem like a tall order, if a company can help cultivate this generation into leaders through mentoring, professional development, and re-recruitment, they will be rewarded with a loyal team member.

Failure to reassess the corporate organization and culture to include Millennials will result in high turnover and a loss of productivity. It will also alienate the next generation of minds who can help change the face of work as we know it.

Next time we share the best way to communicate with the more junior members of the team.

Millennials Deconstructed

Part 1 of 3

Demographics in the workplace are rapidly changing. Baby Boomers are retiring. Generation X is moving out of middle management into upper level positions, leaving Millennials to fill their shoes. The youngest members of the workplace have a very different approach to work than any other generation before them.

Millennials have often been called a generation of entitlement. While this is not true, it is easy to understand how they gained this stereotype. Children born between the early 1980’s and the early 2000’s have grown up with technology, full schedules of extracurricular activities, and helicopter parents.

They have also witnessed violence in schools and workplaces and have, many times, seen their parents being laid-off after years of loyal service to an employer. Because of all these experiences, they have a basic belief that there is more to life than work and that work can be performed anytime, anywhere.

Next. What Millennials want.

Outsourcing Dividends

Read a piece suggesting 5 small business tasks that pay to outsource. All great suggestions like customer support, taxes, legal, online marketing and Web design and maintenance but, missing one biggie – acquiring talent. Full disclosure. I’m an executive recruiter helping firms find marketing stars.

Empty seats equal missed revenue. I know, I’ve harped on this subject in the past but, in today’s tight, highly-competitive “human capital” market filling those seats with satisfied, long-term revenue producers is critical. Which suggests outsourcing talent acquisition may have a multiplier effect on your business and its growth.

What are experienced, driven marketing executives looking for in today’s market?

Allow me to share comments from an outstanding sales director I spoke with earlier today. He’s looking for a firm with a differentiated product coupled with a strategy to keep ahead of the competition and established culture that unconditionally supports its employees. A place with around 100 dedicated souls who bring a positive attitude, enjoy collaboration and thrive on applauding everyone’s successes.

If that describes your company let’s talk. I’d love to help keep the momentum rushing forward.

Clever Wordsmithing or Just Cause?

 

Read a headline that said something like brands need to worry about culture share suggesting market share was old school. A second headline stating results from the World Value Index asks consumers how aware they were of a brand’s purpose, whether they cared about and supported that purpose, and whether or not purpose motivated them to support the brand. Enso, began the survey in 2016 and only one brand (Amazon) enjoyed a top 10 rank sharing the other 9 spots with non-profits. No surprise there.

As an independent recruiter my firm begins the process learning as much as we can about the client, her/his company, and what makes its products/services valuable to consumers/buyers. Purpose and culture share have been subsets of that initial needs analysis.

It’s clear the time has come to modify the analysis digging deeper to understand the client’s purpose and, importantly, management’s commitment to that purpose. When the going gets tough – like a sharp economic downturn will management hold purpose or make sacrifices to “protect” the bottom-line?

As you read this how much value do you put on your current employer’s purpose and will purpose be a criterion for selecting your next gig?

Working for Fun

Let’s say you’re earning over $300k. Again, in the New Year, your quota was raised so to make the same this year you need to sell $360k. Company offers competitive benefits like unlimited paid vacation (on a modest base) and open-bar Fridays. Account Services is on top of their game but are increasingly spread thin putting more pressure on keeping promises and delivering on time.

So, you looked at your 2017 calendar and tax return only to discover some enlightening facts. Like, after taxes, your earnings were $160k. Over the course of this job you’ve had 3 managers and the company has had two senior level house cleanings. Across 52 work weeks you managed 12 days’ vacation and 12 holidays including Cinco de Mayo.

Here’s where the data tells the real story. You average 12.5 hours working each day not counting commuting: 236 days X 12.5 hours = 2950 hours/year roughly equal to $55 per hour after taxes. Now, go find the last plumber or electrician’s bill and take a look at their hourly fee.

Since educator’s salaries are a hot news topic did you know a secondary school administrator in Silver Springs, MD hourly mean average pay is $53.41 according the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2017)? If you’ve read this far and your head is exploding consider having that intro chat with the next recruiter who reaches out and take the conversation beyond money. You might discover there’s some exciting aspects to living with a company you’ve never considered.