recruiter

Exploring the Undiscovered Career Move

There was a piece in USN&WR citing a career consultant who urged employees to always be on the lookout for new opportunities even those who are happy in their job and well paid. Unfortunately, across various fields of marketing communications, job security is rare. How rare? About as rare as chicken’s teeth. Good people find themselves laid off for reasons beyond their control and, typically, not for lack of performance.

As recruiters, we always look first to the people who are happy, successful and not actively looking for their next opportunity. These are considered by many as highly desirable “A” players. When asked, most CEO’s say when moving through the hiring and interviewing process, they look first for character and integrity because those are traits you can’t teach. And, those traits are shared by the people who are better adept at dealing with a steep learning curve.

So, you “A” players, the next time you get a call from a recruiter, it might be worth a few minutes to listen and learn about the offering. Who knows, it could change your life and, it only takes a minute or less to reply, “I’m not interested at this time but, let’s stay in touch”.

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SAVE THE DAY

It’s very frustrating for a professional recruiter to be called in to “save the day” tasked to find a new hire in an extremely short period of time after an internal search failed to produce any acceptable candidates. Professionals are good at what they do is because they take the necessary time and effort to conduct a thorough search and that doesn’t happen overnight. The most desirable candidates are usually gainfully employed and are not looking for other opportunities.

To find top candidates we start every search with a “blank page” not simply relying our extensive data base. To fill the “blank page” we conduct a thorough needs analysis discussion with the hiring manager and anyone else involved in the hiring decision to fully understand the ideal candidate’s profile covering both soft and hard skills.

So the next time you hear or are tempted to say, “We’ve never had any luck using recruiters” or “We can do what you do so you’re not worth the money” consider this. It’s true, there are bad recruiters out there just like any other profession but the good ones know their value and earn appropriate and fair fees. Most of the elite members of the executive search profession have a solid business education defined by years of experience, continue to be trained in new search methodologies and are dedicated to professional excellence.

We’d like to think that PointClear Search is included in that group.

Are You Catering Your Hiring Process to the Talent Pool?

I read a terrific piece by Mike Daly – The Knights Ghost (see below) on LinkedIn today that calls for two additional observations.
First, empty desks represent a loss of revenue not savings due to an unattached salary. Second, in addition to revenue loss the company also suffers a reputation blow not just from the candidate but, as an influencer, among her/his circle of friends and associates. Some lost revenue is recoverable. Reputation dings add up quickly potentially destroying years of reputation building.
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Offer declined – Candidate accepted another offer.
Manager – Why? How did that happen?
Me- We took too long.
Manager – It’s been only 3 weeks since I talked to her.
Me- 2 weeks too long, she was on the market for 3 weeks when you talked to her.
Manager – Did you know about the offer?
Me- Yes and no. She did not tell me she has an offer pending but it’s a fact, any talented person will have multiple offers within a period of time, I would say 2 to 4 weeks they are off the market.
Manager – So how do we overcome this challenge?
Me- The issue starts with the hiring process. If it’s a lengthy and boring process that does not cater to the talent pool. We will lose every time.
Manager- How do we refine the process to retain top talent?
Me- Treat talent the way they want to be treated. Do not set high walls for them to climb, shorten the hiring process with prompt feedback and collaboration between departments, create job descriptions that make sense, promote your environment and the product or project they will be a part of.
Finally, ask for feedback on the hiring process from new hires and tend to their feedback.
The hiring process has to be exciting and innovative to attract and cater to top talent. “Birds of the same feather flock together”
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What are you doing to avoid losing a star to the competition?

Honesty

Honesty

In one of his acts George Carlin had a telling line about honesty, “Everyone appreciates your honesty until your honest with them. Then you’re an a**hole.”

This dovetails nicely with an old recruiter joke. The hiring manager is conducting an interview with a candidate and everything is going smoothly until the interviewer asks an uninspired but common question, “So what do you consider your greatest weakness?” The candidate answers tersely, “Honesty”. Taken aback, the interviewer says, “I don’t consider honesty to be a weakness”. The candidate replies, “I don’t give a damn what you think”.

Honesty is an interesting facet of the recruiting process. Obviously, candidates, through their resumes or interviews, are often less than transparent. On occasion, every hiring manager will admit to the same lack of transparency. And recruiters may be even worse offenders. At PointClear Search, we try to be guided by the principle of telling people what they need to hear, not what they want to hear. And that goes for both clients and candidates.

We try to fix bad resumes and we coach candidates prior to interviews. If the candidate completely blows the interview, we gently tell them why so they won’t make the same mistake again. When it comes down to a small group of finalists in a bake-off, somebody has to lose and often the real reason someone loses is because the hiring manager simply liked someone better. I’ve seen some very ugly and emotional reactions when I’ve delivered bad news and I’ll admit to sugar-coating the truth when I know a candidate is very emotionally invested.

In the used car business, there’s an old saying “How can you tell when the salesman is lying? His lips are moving!” Politician’s also fall under the same banner. We try real hard not to be that cynical but some days it’s very hard.

Congratulations Roger Tremblay, Mary Henry Humanitarian Award Recipient!

Dream Fund

Congratulations Roger Tremblay, Mary Henry Humanitarian Award Recipient!

Roger Tremblay is a Detroit, Michigan native who graduated from Michigan State University with a BA and MA in Advertising and is a recipient of the University’s Alumni Service Award. He has held sales and management positions with The Wall Street Journal, Southern Living, Texas Monthly, Chicago Magazine, Houston Metropolitan and Media Networks. He is the co-founder, along with Joe Kelly, of Kelly/Tremblay & Co, which was one of the nation’s largest independent media sales firms. He was a Senior Partner at Allen Austin Global Executive search before starting PointClear Search with Dave Manchee.

Roger, in addition to many years of service to DREAM Fund, is a director of the Michigan State University of Alumni Association, both internationally and locally here in DFW. Roger also serves as a mentor for graduate students at MSU. He has given countless volunteer hours in both leadership and volunteer positions for AAF Dallas and initiated and created the first AIME Award in Dallas/Fort Worth.

Roger, most deserving of this recognition, will be presented with the award at the AWM Awards of Excellence Gala on April 7th.

What They Need to Hear

What Clients Need to Hear

One reoccurring conundrum in the recruiting world occurs when market facts contradict client’s beliefs.  It’s happening with growing frequency as the flow of information floods decision-making.  The downside is suspect information that may not be valid in real time.

PointClear Search Principal and Founder, Roger Tremblay, continually reminds us of a simple truth well illustrated above, “Tell the client what the need to hear not what they want to hear”.

It’s not always a comfortable conversation but, at the end of the day, it’s always the right conversation. And, it always builds trust and confidence.

How Do I Know I’m Working With The Right Recruiter?

Innovation

As a candidate I’ve worked with some very talented recruiters. I’ve also had conversations with recruiters who were clearly only working for themselves. From a candidate’s perspective here are five questions you should ask yourself.

1. Is the initial conversation with the recruiter focused on you, your career goals and needs or, is the recruiter hard selling the job he/she is trying to fill?
2. Does the job presented by the recruiter fit your personal and career goals? Does it fulfill your immediate and long-term needs?
3. Can the recruiter provide meaningful insights into his or her client company’s business model, culture, leadership, and competitive advantage (verses he/she lazily directing you to the client’s website suggesting you “check ‘em out and let me know what you think”)?
4. Has the recruiter set realistic expectations with you about the steps in the hiring process and timing?
5. Are you receiving regular communications regarding your status in the hiring process? And, timely replies to your inquiries?

If your answers are “yes” you’re working with someone with a genuine interest in furthering your career. Congratulations!

2016 Resolutions

 

I resolve to do a better job for my clients by:

  • Learning as much as possible about my client’s company and culture.
  • Forwarding as many exceptional candidates as the market provides.
  • Telling my clients what they need to hear as opposed to what I think they want to hear.

I resolve to do a better job for my candidates by:

  • Learning as much about my candidate’s character and integrity as their experience and skill set.
  • Keeping them in the loop on the hiring process with regular communications.
  • Providing them with realistic expectations and thorough preparation for interviews.

And, I resolve to continue to ALWAYS tell the absolute truth to both parties.

Job Candidates Do You Own This Nightmare?

Nightmare

It’s every recruiter’s nightmare. You spend hours sourcing and, then, in great detail, present the perfect candidate. Followed by negotiating an offer that both the client and the candidate find acceptable. After a verbal acceptance, the candidate uses the offer as leverage to gain a better deal from their present employer. In the end, Ms./Mr. Recruiter, it makes you look stupid in front of your client and left feeling resentful that the candidate “played” you.

But as the saying goes, “Fool me once, shame on you: fool me twice shame on me”.

Candidates who accept counter offers make a huge mistake. The statistics are undeniable. People who accept a counter offer are usually gone within a year. Why? They remember how unhappy they were in the first place. And recruiters have long memories. Some refer to this (unethical) move as a “bridge burner”. And know this, smart employers NEVER make counter offers because they’ve learned from past experience unhappy employees always come to the senses. And leave.

While today’s economy teaches people there is no such thing as corporate loyalty (except in rare instances), personal loyalty has never been stronger. Baby boomers were taught early in their careers to never make enemies because one never knew where that person might end up – client, boss or colleague. This is a lesson many Millennials don’t seem to have fully grasped. And, they wonder why they encounter such strong resentment from their more experienced associates.