Work Life Balance

RECOGNIZING the SIGNS of BURNOUT


Monday morning blues. But, have you ever experienced a case of the “Sundays”?

Everyone has a bad day here or there, maybe even a bad week. When there are more bad days at work than good, it is time to take a hard look at the situation.

Burnout is a cumulative effect and can creep up on you if you are not cognizant of the warning signs. It usually occurs when underestimating stress or working too long without adequate time off. When one works overtime, they tend to neglect their outlets for relieving stress, including spending time with family and friends, hobbies, reading for pleasure, or exercise.

When a person experiences burnout, all of their relationships suffer. As relationships breakdown, the person experiencing burnout begins to feel even more stress.

The best way to prevent burnout is to recognize the most common signs. Knowing the common and personal signs of burnout is important:

• A feeling of dread during the workweek and on Sunday night
• Performing work on autopilot
• Physical and mental exhaustion
• Frequent colds or illnesses
• Feeling annoyed by everything and everyone

Burnout can be attributed to half of all employee turnover, making it very costly for organizations within all industries. The top contributors to burnout include unfair compensation, increasing workloads, and too much overtime. Other contributors include poor management, lack of connection to the role, and company culture.

Recognizing the signs of burnout in yourself and in your teams can help increase satisfaction and retention. Fostering a culture that supports staff and allows for open communication can help relieve stress and the potential for burnout.

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 3 of 3)

When recruiting, become dedicated to building a team of people who are compatible and enjoy working together. When interviewing for cultural fit, make sure the candidate fits not only the position, but the organizational dynamic. When people who genuinely like and respect each other work together, there is a dramatic increase in recruiting and retention. Your teams are more likely to share how much they enjoy working at your organization and will more likely refer top talent.

Once your organization’s values are defined and the corporate culture is created, it is time to spread the word. Ask all employees to engage with the organization on social media and encourage them to post frequently. Demonstrate your culture with videos of life in the office, team members serving their communities, or share how employees enjoy their time away from work. In the end, happy employees will gladly share in the vision and values, which will yield more recruiting success.

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 2 of 3)

To build an intentional corporate culture, it is first important to define your organization’s values. A strong values proposition statement, unique to your company, will help define the culture. It is important to ignore another organization’s values, defining your own so that they ring genuine. Create values that reflect your company and the employee lifestyle and are in keeping with the goals of your organization. When doing this, gather input from all areas of the company.

Be open to possibilities from all team members. Encourage innovative thinking. Empower them to explore solutions to issues and to create new ideas, initiatives, and products. When an organization values the input from all team members as part of their culture, an environment of forward thinking and collaboration is fostered. Employees will trust in the brand that values their input.

Next: Recruiting for Cultural Fit

Intentional Culture Benefits All (Part 1 of 3)

Ever feel like your employees feel differently about your organization than you do? Do your employees understand the company’s culture and value system? Your organization is a living, breathing entity, and its pulse is defined by a well-established culture and the value system that keeps its rhythm.

Corporate culture is not a mission statement, it is a way of life both in and out of the office. A successful corporate culture is shaped and managed by core company values. These values are what create the basis for hiring and branding. After salary, culture is the most important aspect of an organization to employees and candidates alike.

Intentional corporate culture will increase employee engagement, productivity, customer service, and revenue. For a culture to be successfully adopted by an entire organization, Executive Management must believe in the culture. Since buy-in trickles downstream, no one will fully believe in the company’s value statement, brand, and culture without knowing that it is supported and adhered to by those at the very top. It is vital that leaders set the standard in this way and believe in the culture they wish to establish and maintain.

Next: Building an Intentional Culture

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 3 of 3

Include videos on the Careers page that highlight different aspects of the company and corporate culture. “Day in the Life at XYZ Company” is a great way to attract candidates. Employee profiles and photos of how employees and the company give back to the community are also great talent-magnets.

Retaining Millennials is not as difficult as anticipated. There are five BIG factors to retention.
• Transparency of corporate culture.
• Communication – frequent and through many different means including email, text, and face-to-face.
• Constant feedback – frequent feedback on a monthly, weekly, or even daily basis.
• Clearly defined expectations – written outlines and milestones for projects. Define position requirements and expectations.
• Sense of purpose – have a means, either within the company or on personal time, to give back to the community.

Attracting and retaining Millennials is easy if you know where to go and what they are looking for in a company. It is without a doubt that this group of talent will help reshape work as we know it.

Attracting and Retaining Millennials

Part 2 of 3

Technology is the obvious choice since they are so dependent upon it. Submitting a resume or application online is second nature to a group who took exams and applied for college online. Eighty-seven percent of new college grads will go directly to a company’s website to search and apply for open positions. However, they will not take time to look for postings on the website. Adding a “Careers” link on the home page of the company’s website is the best way to direct not only Millennials, but all candidates to current opportunities.

Brand recognition and corporate culture are the biggest factors to Millennials. They seek positions that are challenging and lead to opportunities for advancement. When crafting job posts or company profiles, highlight projects they may work on, mentorship opportunities, and potential advancement tracks.

Next: Include Videos

Communicating with Millennials Continued

Part 3 of 3

In the spirit of communicating via summary sheets and videos, keep in mind that Millennials are a generation who are happy to converse via text, so when writing emails, keep them brief. Utilize the subject line to give a snapshot of the email. Better yet, utilize text. Texting is not only an acceptable form of communication but may garner a quicker response than email.

While Millennials may seem to speak a different language of IDK (I don’t know) and TL;DR (Too long; didn’t read), learning their language and communication preferences can benefit the organization as a whole.

Communicating with Millennials Continued

Part 2 of 3

 

When explaining important information, such as benefits, specific policies and procedures, and the like, face-to-face communication is best. Eighty-six percent of Millennials say that benefits influence their decision to stay with an employer. However, they do not want to spend time reading to learn about their benefits. Instead of over-stuffed information packets, face-to-face benefits presentations along with short, graphic summary sheets work best. If a face-to-face presentation is not possible, utilizing a video presentation is just as effective.

Summary sheets and videos are effective not only for benefits information, but for all aspects of the on-boarding process and company wide updates and announcements. Building a robust company intranet complete with benefits information, summary sheets, contact lists, videos, and more will keep engaged and everyone else informed.

Next: Text Speak

Communicating with Millennials

Part 1 of 3

While technology has been embraced in most of areas of the corporate world, there are still areas that remain in the “dark ages” of large handbooks, guides, and pamphlets. This is especially true when it comes to employee benefits information or other on-boarding and training materials. And, communication methods remain low-tech at some companies. With more and more Millennials entering the workforce, these methods can lead to a complete communication breakdown.

Millennials are technology dependent. They have no concept of a world without the internet and are more comfortable reading from a computer screen and typing on a keyboard, rather than writing in a notebook. Today, more college students use electronic textbooks than traditional textbooks. When sharing new employee materials or updated information, it is best to do so electronically. Placing employee handbooks, benefits package information, summary sheets, and other important information on a company intranet is ideal for everyone, not just the youngest team members.

Next: Benefits Count

INCLUDING MILLENNIALS

 

Part 3 of 3 – Millennials

You may recall Millennials want diversity in the workplace, flexibility, safety and career security, jobs that nurture their core values and the opportunity to constantly gain new experience.

While this may seem like a tall order, if a company can help cultivate this generation into leaders through mentoring, professional development, and re-recruitment, they will be rewarded with a loyal team member.

Failure to reassess the corporate organization and culture to include Millennials will result in high turnover and a loss of productivity. It will also alienate the next generation of minds who can help change the face of work as we know it.

Next time we share the best way to communicate with the more junior members of the team.